Ways You Can Help

We welcome and appreciate your talent, time and generosity in all forms. We are looking for volunteers to help with the following.

Educational Programme Volunteers

Educational Programme Volunteers

Publicity Team Volunteers

Publicity Team Volunteers

Awareness Team Volunteers

Awareness Team Volunteers

Product/Area Sponsors

Product/Area Sponsors

Barré is an official affiliate of Charis Singapore. We are a voluntary charity group that serves the poor in the Central Highlands of Vietnam.

We welcome all forms of help.

barre-charis

Barré is aimed at working alongside KMF in helping to support the education of ethnic minority children in Vietnam to open up more opportunities for them as well as their families. Most of the families are extremely impoverished, and have difficulties making ends meet. They live far up in the highlands of Vietnam where it is difficult to buy food and daily essentials from the nearby towns. Most are uneducated and have lived in the highlands all their life, where they have been overlooked by the government and are too poor to send their children to mainstream Vietnamese schools to receive the most basic of education.

In this light, Barré seeks to work with KMF to provide education for more of these ethnic minority children and to give them a better future. To read more about our relationship with the natives there, go to our trip photo journal

Current Situation

  • Ethnic demographics
    Vietnam is a multi-ethnic country with over fifty distinct groups (54 are recognized by the Vietnamese government), each with its own language, lifestyle, and cultural heritage. The largest ethnic group is: Kinh (Viet) 86.2%.
  • Geography
    The ethnic minorities usually live in the mountainous regions or highlands of Vietnam, and are usually far removed from the towns and city happenings. As a result, they do not possess the same opportunities as the ethnic majority Kinh, such as education, food, housing, and job opportunities.
  • Education
    It is also notable that many of the ethnic minorities live in tribes and cannot speak Vietnamese, the language of instruction in schools. This creates an invisible barrier to accessing education in schools.
  • Economic livelihood
    For many minority communities, living in the highlands equates to subsistence farming, which, more often than not, is barely enough to feed the children of the community. The land is arid and inaccessible.
  • Social reality
    The Bahnah minority live in shacks, walk miles just to get to a church, or eat just homegrown sweet potatoes or vegetables for meals. Even with charitable help, most of the children have only 2 meals a day.
  • Poverty
    The children whose families cannot afford to send them to school, spend their afternoons wandering around or playing in trash lying about on road. Those higher in the mountains have playgrounds that really are plots of dusty, uneven, empty land.
  • Daily life is a struggle for them. This is not to say they are unhappy, because they know not a different life.